Physics Alive
The POGIL Project with Rick Moog

The POGIL Project with Rick Moog

November 29, 2021

POGIL is an acronym for Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning. It is a student-centered, group-learning instructional strategy and philosophy developed through research on how students learn best. Today we learn all about POGIL from Rick Moog, Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Franklin & Marshall College. He is the Executive Director of The POGIL Project and has implemented POGIL learning environments in his courses since 1994. 

 

Check out the show notes at:

www.physicsalive.com/pogil

 

The POGIL homepage

Two articles co-authored by Dr. Moog, the origins of POGIL:

Other articles and books

More resources from the POGIL website:

Want to hear more from Rick? Listen to members of the POGIL team interview Dr. Moog on the POGIL Podcast:

An Interview with the Host of Physics Alive

An Interview with the Host of Physics Alive

October 23, 2021

An interview with Brad Moser, the host of Physics Alive. This episode was recorded at a live session at the 2021 Florida AAPT fall meeting. The tables have turned, as Brian Lane from Let's Code Physics takes a turn interviewing the host about the show.

Labs: Stop Verifying and Start Investigating with Natasha Holmes

Labs: Stop Verifying and Start Investigating with Natasha Holmes

October 6, 2021

Natasha Holmes, Assistant Professor at Cornell University, studies teaching and learning in physics and other STEM courses, especially the efficacy of hands-on laboratory courses. She asks: How do we know what labs are achieving? And, what teaching methods improve outcomes? Today, she’ll share what we should stop trying to do in lab and what we might try instead.

 

Show notes at: www.physicsalive.com/lab

 

Selected articles authored and co-authored by Natasha Holmes

Links to other articles and resources mentioned in the episode

 

 

Teaching Expertise with Carl Wieman

Teaching Expertise with Carl Wieman

September 21, 2021

Today I’m speaking with Carl Wieman, 2001 Nobel Laureate, Professor of Physics and Professor of the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University, and recipient of the 2020 Yidan Prize, the world’s largest prize in education. He answers the question: How do people learn to make better decisions? “They practice them, and they get feedback on that practice, and they practice some more. If you practice something very intently, your brain changes the connections to be better at doing it.” We discuss what he has uncovered in his scientific study of teaching and learning.

 

For today's complete show notes, go to:

www.physicsalive.com/carl

 

Toward the end of the episode, Carl mentions a series of three papers. Each paper discusses courses that are all taught with same set of principles. Those principles are:

Practicing the thinking you want students to do, monitoring that, do timely feedback, and then letting them go back to practicing.

 

 

What are some resources for new teachers or a teacher wanting to do something new?

 

 

Fluency Bias and Deliberate Practice with Louis Deslauriers

Fluency Bias and Deliberate Practice with Louis Deslauriers

September 17, 2021

This is part 2 of an interview with Louis Deslauriers, the Director of Science Teaching and Learning and Senior Preceptor in Physics at Harvard University. We discuss two recent publications from his research group. In the first, he finds that students can actually feel like they are learning more while passively listening to a polished lecture than engaging in active learning. We’ll talk about that finding and what that means. In the second, we dive into his latest work on deliberate practice, and how we might take the gains from active learning in the classroom and boost them up even more by transforming homework.

 

Find the full show notes at:

www.physicsalive.com/louis2

 

Articles mentioned in Part 1 and Part 2 of this interview:

The Wins and Challenges of Active Learning with Louis Deslauriers

The Wins and Challenges of Active Learning with Louis Deslauriers

September 10, 2021

Louis Deslauriers, the Director of Science Teaching and Learning and Senior Preceptor in Physics at Harvard University, discusses what he’s learned the last decade about the successes and challenges of research-based instructional strategies for both students and faculty.

 

Full episodes notes at:

www.physicsalive.com/louis

 

Articles mentioned in Part 1 and Part 2 of this interview:

Quotes:

  • If students learn [how to solve the Schrodinger equation] as a set of procedures, then they might as well be a set of phone numbers. The research from cognitive psychology is very clear: factual information gets lost within a few weeks; it’s gone. But students that code information conceptually...that is a lot more robust over time.

  • We know that researched based instructional strategies work. How do we keep it up? What are the key supports to ongoing implementation? The number one thing is proper faculty training. And the next is a supportive departmental environment.
  • Give students time and space to think. If you do that, learning will improve.
Better Allies with Karen Catlin

Better Allies with Karen Catlin

August 13, 2021

Show notes at www.physicsalive.com/ally

Karen Catlin, a leadership coach and an acclaimed author and speaker on inclusive workplaces. She coaches women to be stronger leaders and men to be better allies for members of all underrepresented groups. In her book and through her online presence, Karen shares how to cultivate an environment where coworkers feel welcome, respected, and supported, how to amplify and advocate for others, and how to use more inclusive language. She gives us the tools to be Better Allies and create a culture where everyone can do their best work and thrive. Today we discuss this in the context of science department meetings and the STEM classroom.

Karen Catlin's web presence

Subscribe to the 5 Ally Actions newsletter

Document highlighting 50 Potential Privileges in the Workplace

TEDx talk: Women in Tech

From the National Center for Education Statistics

2021 Excellence in Undergraduate Physics Teaching with Anne Cox

2021 Excellence in Undergraduate Physics Teaching with Anne Cox

August 1, 2021

In episode #26 of Physics Alive, I speak with the recipient for the 2021 David Halliday and Robert Resnick Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Physics Teaching, Anne Cox. She is a Professor of Physics at Eckerd College. This award is given in recognition of contributions to undergraduate physics teaching, and awardees are chosen for their extraordinary accomplishments in communicating the excitement of physics to their students. Anne’s current research interests are curriculum development and pedagogical strategies to enhance student learning using technology. She is a contributing author of Physlet Physics: Interactive Illustrations, Explorations, and Problems for Introductory Physics and co-author of Physlet Quantum Physics, both now available on AAPT ComPADRE. 

 

Full show notes at:

www.physicsalive.com/hr21

 

Halliday and Resnick award announcement

Article:

 

2021 Excellence in K-12 Physics Teaching with Brad Talbert

2021 Excellence in K-12 Physics Teaching with Brad Talbert

August 1, 2021

In episode #25 of Physics Alive, I speak with the 2021 Paul Zitzewitz Excellence in K-12 Physics Teaching Award winner, Brad Talbert. He is a physics teacher at Lone Peak High School in Highland, Utah. This award is in recognition for contributions to pre-college physics teaching, and awardees are chosen for their extraordinary accomplishments in communicating the excitement of physics to their students.

 

Full show notes at:

www.physicsalive.com/pz21

 

Learn more about Brad Talbert and the AAPT Paul Zitzewitz Award here.

 

STEPUP for Women in Physics

STEPUP for Women in Physics

July 19, 2021

Show notes also available at www.physicsalive.com/stepup

Episode Description:

STEP UP is a national community of physics teachers, researchers, and professional societies seeking to mobilize physics teachers to help engage young women in physics and change deep-seated cultural views about physicists. I’m speaking with Anne Kornahrens, STEP UP Project Manager and Bree Barnett Dreyfuss, High School Physics Teacher and a Teacher Advisor & Consultant for the project. Learn all about the project, the resources you can access, and the community you can join.

Weblinks:

The STEPUP website:

Direct links to

 

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